An introduction from Dr. Maloney:

Welcome to SeanMMaloney.com! We are now into our fifth year of providing you with a comprehensive compilation of work on national security issues. In this site you will find links to the books I have authored and co-authored, abstracts and links to numerous downloadable journal articles, and a section which includes unpublished material of mine considered too provocative by media and academic outlets.

As citizens of free and democratic nations we are obligated to remain informed on national security issues if we wish to remain free and democratic. It is part of my mandate as historian, professor, writer, and traveller to make my material and observations available so that it can stimulate thought, produce new perspectives, and hopefully enhance your understanding of these complex issues.

From knowledge comes power.. - Sean M. Maloney, PhD.

About Dr. Maloney

Dr. Sean Maloney is a history professor at Royal Military College of Canada and taught in the War Studies Programme there for ten years. He is currently the historical advisor to the Canadian Army for the war in Afghanistan. He previously served as the historian for 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade, the Canadian Army’s primary Cold War NATO commitment, right after the re-unification of Germany and at the start of Canada’s long involvement in the Balkans. Dr. Maloney has extensive field experience in that region, specifically in Croatia, Bosnia, Kosovo and Macedonia from 1995 to 2001.

In addition, Dr. Maloney has had occasion to travel throughout the Middle East studying the various Arab-Israeli conflicts and the myriad of international peacekeeping efforts designed to contain them. His work on stabilization and peacekeeping operations was interrupted by the 9-11 attacks and from 2001 Dr. Maloney has focused nearly exclusively on the war against the Al Qaeda movement, and in particular on the Afghanistan component of that war. He has traveled regularly to Afghanistan since 2003 to observe coalition operations in that country and somewhat inadvertently became the first Canadian military historian to go into ground combat at the company level since the Second World War.